A Rose (The Pilgrim) and a Tip for a Happy Life

Name of Rose: The Pilgrim

Class: Shrub (David Austin Rose)

Registration Name: AUSwalker

Hybridizer: David Austin

Date of Introduction: 1987

‘The Pilgrim’ rose hybridized by David Austin and introduced in 1987 is not named after the pilgrims in Massachusetts but the pilgrim in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Parentage is ‘Graham Thomas’ x ‘Yellow Button’. It grows 4 ft tall x 5 ft wide and up to 10 ft as a climber. Its perfectly formed blooms are quite large, shallowly cupped, rosette-shaped and up to 170 petals. The beautiful yellow color pales towards the edges of the blooms, giving a charming softness that is rare among yellow roses. The soft green foliage complements the soft yellow blooms. It has a delicious medium to strong Tea and myrrh fragrance. The bush is quite healthy and repeats very well.

In warmer areas, it is a good idea to do summer pruning to keep the plant upright and bushy. It is superb as a climber, one of the best English Rose climbers. It will quickly reach some height and still produce flowers and leaves lower down on the plant which is rare among climbers.

Tip of the Day – Learn how to cook one awesome meal to make those dinner parties much more special. (Not just on Thanksgiving).

A Rose (Secret) and a Motivational Tip for the Day

Name of the Rose: Secret

Class: Hybrid Tea

Registered Name: HILaroma

Hybridizer – Daniel Tracy/E.G. Hill Co.

Date of Introduction: 1992

This exhibition quality pink blend Hybrid Tea is a winner of the All-America Rose Selections Award in 1994, Portland Best Rose in 1998 and the Gamble Fragrance Award in 2003. It is white with raspberry pink edges and is both excellent on the show table and garden display. It is a medium, moderately thorny, bushy plant with an upright habit, semi-glossy dark green leaves on long stems and produces lots of large high-centered blooms 4 to 6 inches across. It grows 3 to 5 ft tall and 2 to 3 ft across. Blooms come on single stem or in clusters of three or four. Blooms are double (30 to 40 petals) and tend to get larger in cool weather.

Secret is a generous performer giving blooms from late spring to early summer and repeats through to fall. It can be used in beds and borders and if you need lots of fragrant blooms to share with others, plant Secret in the cutting garden in threes so the plants look bushier. It has a strong, spicy fragrance. It is winter hardy and has good disease resistance. Who says modern hybrid tea does not have any fragrance? Secret can perfume a room with just one bloom.

Tip of the Day – Be around positive people who do positive things.

A Rose (Pristine) and a Motivational Tip for the Day


Name of Rose – Pristine

Class – Hybrid Tea

Hybridizer – Warriner

Date of introduction – 1977

Registration Name – JACpico

Parentage – ‘White Masterpiece’ x ‘First Prize’

‘Pristine’ has the delicate look of porcelain, you’ll be tempted to feel the petals to see if it is real. The bloom is high-centered, double (30-35 petals), large – six inches across and somewhat ruffled. Most often, it comes singly on a long, thick stem although quite thorny, with large, dark green glossy leaves. It is a very vigorous plant and very disease resistant. It can be used for cut flower or for garden display. It has gathered enough trophies to be a favorite among exhibitors.

The tapered bud opened white to creamy petals blushed with light to medium pink on the edge of the petals and displaying orange-yellow stamens in the center. Fragrance is light. Habit is quite tall and spreading, from 4 to 7 ft. tall and 3 to 6 ft. wide. It tends to spread its canes sideways so prune it to inward-facing buds to discourage sprawling. It blooms continuously throughout the season. The best location for this rose is in the back of the border. Good companion plants are pink flowered plants and some blue stately delphiniums. For regions with harsh winter, it requires winter protection.

Tip of the Day – Keep your desk and work area neat and clean.

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda

A Rose (Sunshine Daydream) And A Tip For A Successful Living

Sunshine Daydream – 2012 AARS Winner

After two years going through the toughest tests in their test gardens across the country, the All-America Rose Selections had a winner for 2012. The 2012 only AARS winner is Sunshine Daydream hybridized by Meilland International and introduced by Conard-Pyle Co./Star Roses.

Sunshine Daydream is a butter-yellow grandiflora with lighter edges and an ovoid bud form that turns into cup-shaped flower as it opens up. It is complemented with dark green, glossy foliage on a round and bushy plant, 5-1/2 ft tall and up to 4-1/2 ft wide. Sunshine Daydream has a large flower size with about 25-to 35 petals and blooms continuously from spring to late fall. Disease resistance is excellent including blackspot. It has no fragrance.

For a great flower color and bloom production, Sunshine Daydream surely is a winner to all rose lovers and gardeners. Sunshine Daydream’s sunny color will brighten any garden. I planted one in front of my house and it is the only yellow rose in that flower bed.

Tip of the day – Never invest more in the stock market than you can afford to lose.

The Hildesheim Rose and a Motivational Tip for the day

 

Hildesheim Rose 2
Photo Credit – Wikipedia

I hear it all the time that rose is difficult to grow and yet the Hildesheim Rose, (Rosa canina commonly called dog rose) is estimated at approximately 1,000 years old. It is said to be the oldest rosebush in the world. It is the one climbing the wall of the apse of the Cathedral of Hildesheim in their courtyard at Hildesheim, Germany. It is a symbol of the city of Hildesheim and its prosperity. According to the legend, as long as the rose keeps blooming, Hildesheim will not decline. During World War II in 1945 allied bombers destroyed the cathedral yet the rose not only survived the bomb attacks but it grew new shoots just a few weeks later and soon was growing strong as ever. It has withstood war, drought, pestilence and poison gas to bloom serenely every summer against the Cathedral wall.

There are several mythical explanations of the origin of this rose. The most appealing story is that of Emperor Louis who became separated from his men while out hunting for deer. Night was falling and the snow was blowing fiercely about him as he hung his crucifix on a thorn tree, knelt and prayed for help. Worn out from his exertion he curled up in the snow and slept. The next morning, he awoke to find his crucifix hanging from a rose tree in full bloom. And through the leafless forest he saw his men walking toward him. In thanksgiving he built a chapel on the spot. The chapel grew in size until it became the great Cathedral of Hildesheim against which the rose still blooms.

Tip of the day – Don’t miss the chance to ask your grandparents questions before they die. They are a great resource of valuable life lessons but ask before it’s too late.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose named after Our Lady of Guadalupe and a Motivational Tip for the Christmas Season

IMG_3220

 

In the Rose Gardening World, Our Lady of Guadalupe is a lovely pink Floribunda with 25 petals. Our Lady of Guadalupe Rose blooms are complemented with reddish green leaves and very healthy. It is prolific bloomer and as good if not better than Knock Out roses in my garden.

 

When it was first introduced, only Jackson and Perkins carried it for a while with part of the sales going to a charity. It is such a lovely rose in the garden. I had two bushes planted in the middle of a formal garden with six roses on the same bed. On one of my Ice Cream Socials at my garden in New York, I showed the rose to the priest who was attending the Ice Cream Social. I also had two American Beauty roses, the priest’s favorite rose on the bed and two Brother Cadfael roses, another pink rose. The priest decided to bless the bed and the whole garden.

 

The following winter, we had a very harsh winter and lo and behold, the roses in that bed all died except Our Lady of Guadalupe. I then replaced the four roses with John Paul II, Brother Cadfael, Glamis Castle and Tess d’Urbervilles. When we had the Ice Cream Social again the next year, Fr. Burns was back and I told him the story. He could not believe it and told me he would tell his mother who loved to garden.

 

The feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe is Dec. 12. Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico. Our Lady of Guadalupe dates back to the 16th century, when, according to tradition, an Aztec Indian named Juan Diego had a vision of the Virgin Mary in December 1531 who identified herself in Spanish. The appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe generated the conversion of Mexico, Central and South America to Catholicism. Indeed, Our Lady of Guadalupe became an integral part of Mexican life and a central figure to the history of Mexico itself. The three most important religious celebrations in Central and South America are Christmas, Easter, and December 12, the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Her appearance in the center of the American continents has contributed to the Virgin of Guadalupe being given the title “Mother of the Americas”. After the Spanish Conquest, Diego was one of the first converts to Christianity, according to believers. He was canonized in 2002, making him the first indigenous American saint.

 

Tip of the Day – Share your time, treasure and talent to help others.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

A Rose (Olympiad) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 

Olympiad by Flickr
Photo Credit – Flickr.com

Parentage – (‘Red Planet’ x ‘Pharaoh’), 1982
Hybridizer – Sam McGredy, New Zealand
Introducer – Armstrong Nursery, Ontario, California

Olympiad was the official rose of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. It was also the winner of the All America Rose Selection Award in 1984 and the Gold Medal Portland Award in 1985. Olympiad is one of the best red hybrid teas as a bedding rose for gardeners and an excellent source for cut flower. The blooms come usually singly on long stems. Olympiad has good repeat throughout the season. The long pointed buds unfurl to double (35 to 40 petals), large (4 – 5 inches across), high-centered brilliant clear red flowers with a mild fragrance. Very thorny stems bear medium green, semi-glossy foliage with medium red new growth.

Olympiad

Olympiad is a tall (4 to 6 ft with a spread of 3 to 4 ft.) upright, compact rose plant. Disease resistance is generally good but if you have a problem with black spot in your area, it is advisable to take preventive measures. If only Olympiad had a strong fragrance, it could be a perfect rose.

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a good posture. Enter a room with poise and confidence.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.
Rosalinda Morgan

A rose (Rosa Rugosa) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 
Rosa rugosa

Rosa rugosa roses are very attractive plants but prickly, heavily armored with unforgiving thorns and noted for its wrinkled or rugose foliage. Rosa rugosa produces an abundance of flowers in almost any soil, from heavy clay to beach sand and is a rich source of vitamin C. Rosa rugosa blooms for a long period of time and bears either single or double blossoms with wonderful fragrance. After the petals fall, the plants produce rose hips of a deep red-orange. Rosa rugosa are extremely hardy, except maybe in the most northern gardens. They can be planted in a row to serve as a dense, impenetrable hedge. They are disease-free and rarely bothered by insects. They are also useful in cosmetics and in food. 

 

Rosa rugosa can sucker and spread throughout the garden. The Rosa rugosa’s sprawling characteristics can be useful in keeping steep banks stabilized. If you live next to the water, it is useful to hold banks against erosion. Rugosa roses thrive on ocean mist and sandy soil to beautify many coastal settings. Rugosa roses are underappreciated because it lacks the show quality of hybrid teas but they are tough plants. 

 

Here is a list of some of the rugosa roses currently available.

Alba – white, single, 6 ft.

Conrad Ferdinand Meyer – Mid-pink, double, 8 ft., train as climber.

David Thompson (Explorer series) – Medium red, double, 4 ft.

F.J. Grootendorst – Medium red. semi-double, fringed petals, 6 ft.

Hansa – violet-red, double, 6 ft.

Henry Hudson (explorer series) – white, double, 3 ft.

Jens Munk (Explorer series) – Medium pink, double, 6 ft.

Linda Campbell – medium red, double, 3-5 ft.

Magnifica – dark red, full, 6 ft.

Martin Frobisher (explorer series) – Light-pink, semi-double, 6 ft.

Max Graf – pink blend, single, 2 ft.

Nova Zembla – white, double, 8 ft.

Sarah Van Fleet – medium pink, semi-double, 8 ft.

Scabrosa – mauve, single, 6 ft.

Sir Thomas Lipton – white, double, 8 ft.

Therese Bugnet – medium pink, full, 6 ft.

White Grootendorst – white, full, 6 ft.

 

Tip of the Day – Strive for excellence, not perfection.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

 

A Rose (Aloha) and a Tip for a happy, healthy and Successful Living

Aloha

 

Class:   Climbing Hybrid Tea

Parentage:   ‘Mercedes Gallart’ x ‘New Dawn’

Hybridizer – Boerner, 1949

 

 

‘Aloha’ is a rose of medium pink color with strong fragrance, reminiscent of Hybrid Perpetuals. This large flowered climber has beautiful blooms on long canes, and a long flowering season, blooming heavily in late spring to early summer, followed by excellent repeat blooms through summer and fall. Most often, flowers come in clusters and occasionally singly. The large, rounded buds open to very double cupped flowers (58 petals) up to 4 inches across. The petals are a medium rosy pink on top with a deeper rose-pink reverse. All the petals have pale edges, and drop cleanly and never ball. Foliage is dark, glossy and leathery and is disease resistant but may show some powdery mildew if not given enough space with good air circulation.

‘Aloha’ is a versatile plant, classified as a climber but can also be used as a shrub. With pruning, it can make a long blooming shrub for a mixed border. As a climber, it can climb 8 to 12 ft. tall with the support of a post, pillar, arbor, fence or trellis. The canes are very attractive arranged on an espalier. It is important to train the canes early on as they tend to get too thick and are impossible to train.

 

Tip #34 – Don’t neglect your teeth. Get regular dental checkups. Brush. Floss your teeth. People with poor oral health are at a higher risk for both heart attack and stroke. A study just came out that found a link between a certain type of oral bacteria and hemorrhagic stroke. So brushing and flossing your teeth every day is important.

 

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

 

A Rose (Rose de Rescht) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Rose de Rescht

Rose:   Rose de Rescht

Class:   Portland

Date of Introduction:   About 1880

 

This compact Portland rose is a very reliable rebloomer. It gives a big flush of tightly-formed rosette blooms in spring, pompon like and if you keep on deadheading it just keeps on blooming. Fragrance is very strong. Buds open in fuchsia-red color and fade into light lilac. ‘Rose de Rescht’ will tolerate some shade.

 

The only disease I find is rust but all I do is prune the stems that are affected and new healthy shoots appear. Parentage is obscure, possibly Persian and discovery date is speculated at about 1880 but its recurring blooming qualities coupled with those old fashioned traits and its strong fragrance entitle this rose a place in any garden, large or small. ‘Rose de Rescht’ is eligible for Victorian Rose Award at a rose show.

 

I planted lavender ‘Hidcote’ next to it. They complement each other in color and fragrance. Since ‘Rose de Rescht’ is a compact little rose, it is also a good specimen for container planting. For history buffs, ‘Rose de Rescht’ was believed to be growing at Castle Howard, in Yorkshire, England before the Second World War.

 

Tip #28 – Do not forgo sunscreen. Wrinkles and skin cancer can be avoided if you protect yourself.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

A Rose (Peace) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Peace Rose

Rose:   Peace

Class:   Hybrid Tea

Date of Introduction: 1945

Parentage:   (‘George Dickson’ x ‘Souvenir de Claudius Pernet’) x (‘Joanna Hill’ x ‘Chas. P. Kilham’) x ‘Margaret McGredy”

Hybridizer:  Francis Meilland in the late 1930s

 

The rose that is called ‘Peace’ in the United States and Great Britain is called ‘Mme Antoine Meilland’ in France, ‘Gioia’ (Joy) in Italy and ‘Gloria Dei” (The Glory of God) in Germany. ‘Peace is one of the most famous roses of the century if not of all times. It is one of the few modern roses surrounded by legend and myth. It was bred by Francis Meilland under the code name 335-40 and named it Madame A. Meilland, after his mother. Francis Meilland hybridized another lemon yellow rose with ‘Peace’ as the parent and named her ‘Grand’mere Jenny’, after his paternal grandmother.

 

One story goes that it was hybridized in France in the last years before World War II, and escaped as unnamed cuttings in the last American diplomatic bag to leave Paris as World War II began. Recognized as a winner, the rose was propagated by Conard-Pyle Co., a leading American rose nursery and released in 1945. Because it returned in peacetime to a liberated France, ‘Peace’ was the name the rose was given. Later, the ‘Peace’ rose took the world by storm after being the centerpiece on all the tables at the organizational meeting of the United Nations at San Francisco in 1945.

 

Another version of the story of ‘Peace’ is that it began in France when the Nazi invasion forced young Francis Meilland to smuggle three one-pound packages of an experimental rose into other countries. Two of the packages were confiscated, but the third made it to Robert Pyle of Conard-Pyle Co. in the United States. Ten years later, after this rose of outstanding character and quality had been tested throughout the United States, the ARS planned a special name-giving ceremony. At the Pacific Rose Society Exhibition in Pasadena, CA, Robert Pyle declared “We are persuaded that this greatest new rose of our time should be named for the world’s greatest desire – Peace.” Francis Meilland’s rose was given its American and English name ‘Peace’ on April 29, 1945, the day Berlin fell to the allies. Nine years after introduction, an American authority estimated that some thirty million ‘Peace’ were growing in gardens around the world. Nowadays, nobody seems to have kept count. With all the royalties coming from the sale of ‘Peace’, the Meillands were able to build a rose hybridizing empire on the Cap d’Antibes on the Mediterranean shores.

 

Another melodramatic story, so often told, is that the budwood of ‘Peace’ was smuggled out of the south of France by a heroic U.S. embassy official in November 1942, just hours before the German invasion. It’s a very good story, but the truth of the matter according to Francis Meilland, is that the budwood was sent to Germany, Italy and the United States via ordinary postal channels in the summer of 1939. Southern France at that time was not yet invaded. It was perfect timing. By receiving a few cuttings in 1939, Conard-Pyle was able to introduce this rose at the San Francisco conference to found the United Nations, the day Berlin fell in 1945. If these cuttings were received in November 1942 they could not have started budding until 1943, and they could not have built up enough stock of this rose in time for nationwide distribution three years later.

 

The day the war with Japan ended, ‘Peace’ was given the All American Rose Selection Award. A month later, the day the peace treaty was signed with Japan, ‘Peace’ received the American Rose Society’s supreme Award, the Gold Medal. ‘Peace’ has won most of the world’s top rose awards: Gold Medal, Portland 1944; All American Rose Selection 1946; Gold Medal Certificate, American Rose Society 1947; Golden Rose, The Hague 1965; Hall of Fame, World Federation of Rose Societies 1976; and Award of Garden Merit, Royal Horticultural Society 1993. Today, ‘Peace’ is still the world’s favorite rose.

 

‘Peace’ is a vigorous, bushy, upright plant, 4-5 ft. tall with stiff canes covered with large, leathery, beautiful, dark green, glossy foliage with good disease-resistant quality. New growth appears light red. ‘Peace’ resents heavy pruning. Buds are high-centered and cupped at opening. Blooms are double (40 to 45 petals), 5 to 6 inches across, near perfect in form and more or less continuous flowering throughout the season. Colors vary from day to day but are essentially creamy yellow edged in rose pink. It has a slight fragrance. It is a good exhibition rose and an excellent cut flower. It’s rated 8.0 on the 2017 Handbook for Selecting Roses.

 

Flowers were huge in 1940s. Somehow ‘Peace’ planted in the 1940s and still thriving today at well-maintained public gardens, war memorials, or at the homes of veteran gardeners are larger compared to the blooms on the ‘Peace’ plant you will receive from any nursery today. Even if genetic science tells you otherwise, still the ‘Peace’ sold today is just a pale imitation of the old ‘Peace’. Vita Sackville-West hated it and thought it horribly coarse.

 

Hybrid teas bred since the 1950s often have at least a little ‘Peace’ blood in them. Of the many mutations of ‘Peace’ introduced over the years, the most popular is ‘Chicago Peace’. Other sports of ‘Peace’ are ‘Berlin’, ‘Garden Party’, ‘Gold Crown’, ‘Glowing Peace’, ‘Love and Peace’ (2002 AARS Selection), ‘Perfume Delight’, ‘Pink Rose’, ‘Princesse de Monaco’, ‘Royal Highness’, ‘Speaker Sun’, ‘Sterling Silver’, and ‘Tropicana’.

 

A Climbing form was introduced in 1950. ‘Climbing Peace’ is a climbing sport of ‘Peace’. It has shiny, deep green, almost leathery foliage, and it has a very pleasing color, peachy pink suffused with apricot yellow. Its buds are exquisitely pointed, and they open into large, long-lasting flowers. It is so robust and healthy that you never have to spray it with pesticides. Its one real flaw is a complete lack of fragrance.

 

‘Peace’ is showcased at the following Display Gardens: Sturgeon Memorial Rose Garden, Largo, FL; Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta, GA; Julia Davis Rose Garden, Boise, ID; George L. Luthy Memorial Rose Garden, Peoria, IL; Richmond Rose Garden, Richmond, IN; City of Portland Rose Circle, Portland, ME; The Jim Buck Ross Rose Garden, Jackson, MS; and Norfolk Botanical Garden, Norfolk, VA.

 

Tip #27 – Increase your own happiness and peace of mind by paying three sincere compliments each day.

 

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

A Rose (La Reine Victoria) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

La Reine Victoria

Photo from Peter Beales Roses

Rose:   La Reine Victoria

Class:   Bourbon

Date of Introduction:   1872

 

The rich lilac-pink, full, and cupped middle size blooms are produced on a vigorous, slender erect bush almost thornless plant with soft green leaves. It can reach a height of 4 ½ to 5 ½ ft. or can be trained as a climber where it can reach 15’ in each direction. When the canes are pegged over (placed horizontally), this rose responds with lots of lateral growth with long stems. This rose blooms abundantly in mid season with good repeat bloom in the fall where the plant is literally covered with very fragrant 3-3 ½ blooms. A heavy feeder, high nitrogen won’t cause any major maladies. It is winter hardy and very disease resistant.

Tip #23 – Be grateful. Every moment on this earth from the mundane to the amazing is a gift that we are all lucky to share.

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer