A Rose (Simplicity) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Simplicity
Photo Courtesy of Sandy Prior

Simplicity with its reflection in a puddle on the street.

 

Simplicity is a semi-double medium pink floribunda with 18 to 24 petals hybridized by Bill Warriner and introduced by Jackson & Perkins in 1979. Originally Jackson & Perkins sold them in lots of ten as a “living fence”.

It is an excellent landscape rose and is widely considered the first-ever hedge rose. Rosarians love them because they are very healthy and generous on blooms. However, there is very light or no fragrance at all. Its growth is 3-5 ft tall and 2-3 ft wide, vigorous, disease-resistant and winter hardy plant with medium green, semi-glossy foliage. Bloom size is 3”-4” and it blooms well in all climates.

Here are the various Simplicity roses in the market today. They are excellent plants for hedges.

Introduced in 1979 – Pink Simplicity (pictured above)

White Simplicity

Introduced in 1991 – White Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Yellow Simplicity

Introduced in 1998 – Yellow Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Fragrant Lavendar Simplicity

Introduced in 2007 – Fragrant Lavender Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Double Red Simplicity

Introduced in 2011 – Double Red Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a healthy weight to help you prevent or control medical conditions such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, gall stones and breathing problems.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

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A Rose (Peggy Martin) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Peggy Martin

Photo Credit – Chamblee’s Rose Nurseries

 

The Peggy Martin Rose symbolizes the tenacious survival skills of the rose.  One of only two plants in the garden of its owner, Peggy Martin, to remain alive after immersion in 20 feet of water due to Hurricane Katrina.  It is a ‘found’ rambler, virtually thornless, with a small prickle at the beginning of leaf growth, a profusion of dark pink blooms remontant after maturity from spring to hard frost.  The entire story of its selection as a symbol of garden rebirth can be found in an article by Dr. William Welch  at http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/southerngarden/PeggyMartinrose.html.

 

The Peggy Martin Rose is very hardy, can survive a below zero degree temperature and is disease-resistant, fast growing, and after established will bloom again in the Fall along with intermittent flower flushes through the year. Every year in spring, The Peggy Martin Rose will show a spectacular display of flower explosion bigger and more spectacular than the year before.  In the south, it stops blooming in the hottest months of Summer but up north it will bloom continuously.  The Peggy Martin Rose is a very vigorous plant so give it room to grow to show its full potential.  It is great planted on a garden entrance arbor or structure.  It is not a once bloomer!!!

TIP OF THE DAY:   Live your life so that your epitaph could read “No regrets”.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda

 

 

 

A Rose (Iceberg) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 

Iceberg 4
Photo Credit – Flowers My Inspiration

 

 

Class:   Floribunda

Parentage:   ‘Robinhood’ x ‘Virgo’

Date of Introduction:   1958

Hybridizer:   Reimer Kordes

Registration Code:   KORbin

Syns:   ‘Fee des Neiges’, ‘Schneewittchen’

 

I first saw ‘Iceberg’, a white modern, cluster-flowered rose (floribunda) in California about fifteen years ago. I was amazed then at how popular ‘Iceberg’ roses was in Southern California at that time in spite of the rose being 40+ years already since it was first introduced by Reimer Kordes. They were everywhere. We saw a lot of them at private gardens and even at the wineries in Temecula.

 

iceberg.2

 

The flowers are semi-double, 20-25 petals and well formed, pure white with occasional pinkish tints in the bud state, especially in early spring and autumn when the nights are cold and damp. The blooms are produced continuously in clusters of up to 15 per spray, long lasting, both on the bush or as a cut flower. They have a moderate but not overpowering rose fragrance. ‘Iceberg’ can be used as a bedding plant for massed display which was very effective as we saw them in California. ‘Iceberg’ is almost entirely resistant to mildew and suffers only mildly from blackspot. All in all, ‘Iceberg’ is still the best and most popular white floribunda today.

 

‘Climbing Iceberg’ (syn. ‘Climbing Fee des Neiges’), introduced in 1968, is never without bloom, is a disease-resistant, healthy, robust plant. It is not too rampant and can be used to cover small fences or garden structures and even entwine around veranda posts.

 

Awards:

National Rose Society Gold Medal 1958

Baden-Baden Gold Medal 1958

World’s Favorite Rose 1983

Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit 1993.

 

Tip #42 – Make physical fitness a priority. Stop being a couch potato. 

 

Until Next Time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda

 

A Rose (Tournament of Roses) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Tournament of Roses

Class:   Grandiflora

Parentage:   ‘Impatient’ x seedling

Hybridizer – William Warriner

Date of Introduction:   1988

This pink grandiflora of 25 to 30 petals is aptly named in honor of the Tournament of Roses, the famous parade of all times held annually on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, California. Tournament of Roses is an AARS selection in 1989. It is sometimes classified as a hybrid tea because of the shape of its flowers although it is really a grandiflora.

Bloom size is 3.5 inches on long stem with light fragrance. The blooms have all shades of pink within them – deep pink in the center, pale pink at the edges, darker pink on the outside. Tournament of Roses blooms profusely in clusters of 5 to 7 blooms like a floribunda on a medium upright bush with glossy dark green leaves and large prickles. It is highly disease-resistant and easy to grow. It produces blooms well into the winter.  Tournament of Roses is both an excellent rose for exhibition and garden rose with plenty of blooms to enjoy outside in the garden and to take indoors to enjoy.

 

Tip #39 – Don’t accept “good enough” as good enough.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

 Rosalinda

 

 

 

A Rose (Frida Kahlo) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

IMG_2557

 

Class: Floribunda

Hybridizer: Christian Bedard & Tom Carruth

Parentage: ‘City of San Francisco’ x ‘Baby Love’

Registration Name: WEKcifrabaun

Date of Introduction: 2018

Introducer: Weeks Wholesale Rose Grower, Inc.

 

For lovers of striped roses, Frida Kahlo is a great rose – novel coloring, loads of blooms, disease resistant and fragrant. Its yellow, orange and red coloring stood out against its glossy, dark green foliage. A vigorous, bushy, upright plant, it has 5-6 flowers per cluster. The bloom averages 3.5” in diameter and has a mild fragrance. It grows to 30-36” in height with a similar spread of 30-36” in width.

 

When I first saw it on Spring Hill Nurseries catalog which has an exclusive in it, I knew I wanted it. I’m not into orange roses but with the colorful combination of yellow, orange and red, it was not as glaring as a true orange rose. The color is just beautiful. If you like striped roses, this is a must-have. Mine is planted in a pot since I run out of garden space but that did not deter me from getting this rose.

 

Tip #37 – Spend less time worrying who is right and more time deciding what is right.

 

Until Next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

A Rose (Aloha) and a Tip for a happy, healthy and Successful Living

Aloha

 

Class:   Climbing Hybrid Tea

Parentage:   ‘Mercedes Gallart’ x ‘New Dawn’

Hybridizer – Boerner, 1949

 

 

‘Aloha’ is a rose of medium pink color with strong fragrance, reminiscent of Hybrid Perpetuals. This large flowered climber has beautiful blooms on long canes, and a long flowering season, blooming heavily in late spring to early summer, followed by excellent repeat blooms through summer and fall. Most often, flowers come in clusters and occasionally singly. The large, rounded buds open to very double cupped flowers (58 petals) up to 4 inches across. The petals are a medium rosy pink on top with a deeper rose-pink reverse. All the petals have pale edges, and drop cleanly and never ball. Foliage is dark, glossy and leathery and is disease resistant but may show some powdery mildew if not given enough space with good air circulation.

‘Aloha’ is a versatile plant, classified as a climber but can also be used as a shrub. With pruning, it can make a long blooming shrub for a mixed border. As a climber, it can climb 8 to 12 ft. tall with the support of a post, pillar, arbor, fence or trellis. The canes are very attractive arranged on an espalier. It is important to train the canes early on as they tend to get too thick and are impossible to train.

 

Tip #34 – Don’t neglect your teeth. Get regular dental checkups. Brush. Floss your teeth. People with poor oral health are at a higher risk for both heart attack and stroke. A study just came out that found a link between a certain type of oral bacteria and hemorrhagic stroke. So brushing and flossing your teeth every day is important.

 

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

 

A Rose (Alnwick Castle) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

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Rose:   Alnwick Castle

Class:   Shrub

Date of Introduction:   2002

Hybridizer:   David Austin

 

I had ‘Alnwick Castle’ in my garden in New York and I bought one for my garden in Charleston.

‘Alnwick Castle’ has beautiful pink flowers, about 120 petals, cup-shaped buds that gradually open to deeply cupped flowers with pointed edge petals. The color is soft pink with pale pink edges. It is bushy, relatively upright, 4 ft. tall by 2 ½ ft. wide and stays compact. It continues to bloom all season long. Foliage is polished green and perfectly complements the flowers. It is hardy, fairly disease resistant and has a good Old Rose fragrance with just a hint of raspberry.

‘Alnwick Castle’ rose is named for The Alnwick Garden in the UK which has a wonderful collection of roses.

 

Tip #29 – Give others credit for what they do. Show your appreciation of what they have done by saying “thank you”.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer