Romantica Roses

Rouge Royale by Regan Nursery
Rouge Royale – Photo Credit: Regan Nursery

For rose lovers who want the charm and fragrance of the Old Garden Roses with their large variety of flower forms but longer blooming period, there are large selections now available. First, there was David Austin’s English Roses, then other growers started producing roses with the Old Garden Rose characteristics. One of them is the Meilland Company of France (developer of the famous Meidiland family of Landscape Roses. Alain Meilland of the legendary French rose company, the Meilland Company that boasts six generations of family ownership and hybridizer of the Romantica Roses received the Great Rosarians of the World award for 2012.

After David Austin’s success with the English Roses, the House of Meilland followed suit with a series of garden roses blending the best qualities of Heirlooms with modern Floribundas and Hybrid Teas. They call this group of rose Romantica Roses. Many of these varieties were bred in the South of France by Meilland International. These new French Roses represent an important expansion of the English Rose style, with astonishing new varieties and versatility that take the concept pioneered by David Austin to an entirely new level from romantic antique to modern Hybrid Teas, from climbers to shrubs with extensive color ranges, nostalgic pastels to vivid hues, wide selection of attractive plant forms, excellent disease resistance, outstanding foliage typical of the Meilland breeding line, old-fashioned fragrance and dependable repeat flowering habit for all seasons color. These characteristics appeal to both the novice as well as the advanced gardener. Their improved disease resistance and garden performance make them a wonderful addition to the modern landscape.

Here is a list of Romantica Roses that you can incorporate in your garden:

  1. Bolero – F – White – 2004
  2. Dee-lish -HT – Medium Pink – 2011
  3. Francois Rabelais – F – Medium Red – 1998
  4. Guy de Maupassant – F – Medium Pink – 1996
  5. Jean Giono – HT – Yellow Blend – 1998
  6. Michelangelo – HT – Medium Yellow – 1997
  7. Peter Mayle – HT – Deep Pink – 2003
  8. Polka – LCl – Apricot Blend – 1996
  9. Rouge Royal – HT – Red Blend – 2001
  10. Traviata – HT – Dark Red – 1998
  11. White Eden – LCl – White – 2004
  12. Yves Piaget – HT – Medium Pink – 1985

Note: F (Floribunda), HT (Hybrid Tea), LCl (Large-Flowered Climber)

Tip of the Day – When someone is telling you about an important event that happened to them, don’t try to top them with your own story. Let them have the stage.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda R Morgan

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A Rose (Gemini) and a Motivational Tip for the Day

Gemini

Class: Hybrid Tea

Hybridizer: Dr. Keith W. Zary

Date of Introduction: 1999

Parentage: ‘Anne Morrow Lindbergh’ x ‘New Year’

 

‘Gemini’ is always a winner. It won the 2005 Members’ Choice Award from the American Rose Society. It also won the AARS 2000 award. It has all the qualities that exhibitors love – high-centered large blooms, 5”-7” in diameter, double (17-25 petals), and elegantly formed. It has a lighter tint in the spring and gets darker hue as it progresses through the season. The light pink color with a darker hue on the edges is so beautiful. No wonder it always captures a place at the Court of Honor of a Rose Show.

 

Gemini produces plenty of exhibition type blooms on a tall, bushy plant (4-6 ft high x 3 ft wide). Most often, blooms come singly on a long, thick stems with large, deep green glossy foliage. This rose looks great in the garden and in a vase. It also lasts a long time in a vase. If you have one space in your garden, try to get Gemini. It will capture your heart as it does most judges at the Rose Show.

 

Tip of the Day: Set short term and long term goals.

A Rose (Olympiad) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 

Olympiad by Flickr
Photo Credit – Flickr.com

Parentage – (‘Red Planet’ x ‘Pharaoh’), 1982
Hybridizer – Sam McGredy, New Zealand
Introducer – Armstrong Nursery, Ontario, California

Olympiad was the official rose of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. It was also the winner of the All America Rose Selection Award in 1984 and the Gold Medal Portland Award in 1985. Olympiad is one of the best red hybrid teas as a bedding rose for gardeners and an excellent source for cut flower. The blooms come usually singly on long stems. Olympiad has good repeat throughout the season. The long pointed buds unfurl to double (35 to 40 petals), large (4 – 5 inches across), high-centered brilliant clear red flowers with a mild fragrance. Very thorny stems bear medium green, semi-glossy foliage with medium red new growth.

Olympiad

Olympiad is a tall (4 to 6 ft with a spread of 3 to 4 ft.) upright, compact rose plant. Disease resistance is generally good but if you have a problem with black spot in your area, it is advisable to take preventive measures. If only Olympiad had a strong fragrance, it could be a perfect rose.

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a good posture. Enter a room with poise and confidence.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.
Rosalinda Morgan

A rose (Rosa Rugosa) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 
Rosa rugosa

Rosa rugosa roses are very attractive plants but prickly, heavily armored with unforgiving thorns and noted for its wrinkled or rugose foliage. Rosa rugosa produces an abundance of flowers in almost any soil, from heavy clay to beach sand and is a rich source of vitamin C. Rosa rugosa blooms for a long period of time and bears either single or double blossoms with wonderful fragrance. After the petals fall, the plants produce rose hips of a deep red-orange. Rosa rugosa are extremely hardy, except maybe in the most northern gardens. They can be planted in a row to serve as a dense, impenetrable hedge. They are disease-free and rarely bothered by insects. They are also useful in cosmetics and in food. 

 

Rosa rugosa can sucker and spread throughout the garden. The Rosa rugosa’s sprawling characteristics can be useful in keeping steep banks stabilized. If you live next to the water, it is useful to hold banks against erosion. Rugosa roses thrive on ocean mist and sandy soil to beautify many coastal settings. Rugosa roses are underappreciated because it lacks the show quality of hybrid teas but they are tough plants. 

 

Here is a list of some of the rugosa roses currently available.

Alba – white, single, 6 ft.

Conrad Ferdinand Meyer – Mid-pink, double, 8 ft., train as climber.

David Thompson (Explorer series) – Medium red, double, 4 ft.

F.J. Grootendorst – Medium red. semi-double, fringed petals, 6 ft.

Hansa – violet-red, double, 6 ft.

Henry Hudson (explorer series) – white, double, 3 ft.

Jens Munk (Explorer series) – Medium pink, double, 6 ft.

Linda Campbell – medium red, double, 3-5 ft.

Magnifica – dark red, full, 6 ft.

Martin Frobisher (explorer series) – Light-pink, semi-double, 6 ft.

Max Graf – pink blend, single, 2 ft.

Nova Zembla – white, double, 8 ft.

Sarah Van Fleet – medium pink, semi-double, 8 ft.

Scabrosa – mauve, single, 6 ft.

Sir Thomas Lipton – white, double, 8 ft.

Therese Bugnet – medium pink, full, 6 ft.

White Grootendorst – white, full, 6 ft.

 

Tip of the Day – Strive for excellence, not perfection.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

 

A Rose (Eyeconic Lemonade) and a Tip for a healthy Lifestyle

Eyeconic Lemonade
Photo Credit – Conard Pyle 

 

Class: Hybrid Hulthemia

Registered name: ‘PRolem’

 

Eyeconic™ Lemonade is bright sunny yellow rose on the outside with a ring ranging in brilliant deep pink to red eye inside of the petal. Eyeconic™Lemonade has excellent plant habit, very bushy and slightly larger in size than Eyeconic™ Pink Lemonade. It grows about 4 ½ ft. height and 4 ½ ft. wide.

Eyeconic™ Lemonade is ultra-vigorous, blooming heavily over 3 seasons with blooms in clusters of 3 to 5 blooms per stem complemented with dark green, very glossy foliage. The bud is of medium size, pointed and bright yellow developing into a self-cleaning 4-inch cup-shaped bloom with an average of 10-12 petals. It has a great flower power, blooming continuously with non- fading yellow blooms much stronger than most other yellow on the market. It has a very slight fragrance.

Eyeconic™Lemonade is a breakthrough hybrid hulthemia rose, coming from Jim Sproul, a breeder who has been working more than 15 years on Hulthemia hybrids. Eyeconics™ roses are perpetually blooming, self-cleaning, highly disease-resistant roses with “eyes”. The pioneering efforts of Harkness and other rosarians have resulted in the creation of the hybrid hulthemia by breeding the beautiful species Hulthemia persica with garden roses. Closely resembling a wild rose (to which it is almost certainly related), Hulthemia persica has a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and it is this spot that rose breeders wanted to hybridize.

 

Tip of the Day – Get a good night’s sleep. A lack of good sleep can contribute to obesity, injuries, depression and chronic diseases.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Simplicity) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Simplicity
Photo Courtesy of Sandy Prior

Simplicity with its reflection in a puddle on the street.

 

Simplicity is a semi-double medium pink floribunda with 18 to 24 petals hybridized by Bill Warriner and introduced by Jackson & Perkins in 1979. Originally Jackson & Perkins sold them in lots of ten as a “living fence”.

It is an excellent landscape rose and is widely considered the first-ever hedge rose. Rosarians love them because they are very healthy and generous on blooms. However, there is very light or no fragrance at all. Its growth is 3-5 ft tall and 2-3 ft wide, vigorous, disease-resistant and winter hardy plant with medium green, semi-glossy foliage. Bloom size is 3”-4” and it blooms well in all climates.

Here are the various Simplicity roses in the market today. They are excellent plants for hedges.

Introduced in 1979 – Pink Simplicity (pictured above)

White Simplicity

Introduced in 1991 – White Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Yellow Simplicity

Introduced in 1998 – Yellow Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Fragrant Lavendar Simplicity

Introduced in 2007 – Fragrant Lavender Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

Double Red Simplicity

Introduced in 2011 – Double Red Simplicity (Photo courtesy of J&P)

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a healthy weight to help you prevent or control medical conditions such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, gall stones and breathing problems.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Peggy Martin) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Peggy Martin

Photo Credit – Chamblee’s Rose Nurseries

 

The Peggy Martin Rose symbolizes the tenacious survival skills of the rose.  One of only two plants in the garden of its owner, Peggy Martin, to remain alive after immersion in 20 feet of water due to Hurricane Katrina.  It is a ‘found’ rambler, virtually thornless, with a small prickle at the beginning of leaf growth, a profusion of dark pink blooms remontant after maturity from spring to hard frost.  The entire story of its selection as a symbol of garden rebirth can be found in an article by Dr. William Welch  at http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/southerngarden/PeggyMartinrose.html.

 

The Peggy Martin Rose is very hardy, can survive a below zero degree temperature and is disease-resistant, fast growing, and after established will bloom again in the Fall along with intermittent flower flushes through the year. Every year in spring, The Peggy Martin Rose will show a spectacular display of flower explosion bigger and more spectacular than the year before.  In the south, it stops blooming in the hottest months of Summer but up north it will bloom continuously.  The Peggy Martin Rose is a very vigorous plant so give it room to grow to show its full potential.  It is great planted on a garden entrance arbor or structure.  It is not a once bloomer!!!

TIP OF THE DAY:   Live your life so that your epitaph could read “No regrets”.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda