A Rose (Eyeconic Pink Lemonade) And a Tip for a Healthy Living

Pink Lemonade
Photo Credit – Conard Pyle/Star Roses 

 

Registration Name: ‘SPRolempink’

Type: Hybrid Hulthemia

 

Eyeconic™ Shrub Rose is another new breeding breakthrough in the rose world introduced by the Conard-Pyle Co/Star Roses. After many years of attempting to cross modern roses with Hulthemias, (a species-type roses originating in ancient Persia), rose breeder Jim Sproul finally succeeded. The Hulthemias are a once-blooming species with a characteristic red blotch. The Eyeconics™ capture the blotch, but everything else about these roses is modern, from their rebloom to their pleasing small, shrub-like habit to their disease resistance. The bushy 3 to 4-1/2 foot plants are filled with dark green, very glossy foliage that sets off the 2- to 3-inch, ruffled, non-fragrant blooms.

Eyeconic™ Pink Lemonade is light pink to melon rose with a darker red ring surrounding the inside of the petal that is typical of the Hulthemia hybrids. The bud form is small, ovoid open melon-pink with a red ring maturing to shell pink with the red turning to a purplish eye. The medium size bloom is cuplike with an average of 8-10 petals, 3 ½ inches in diameter. The plant is prolific and blooms continuously for months with blooms in cluster of five blooms per stem with dark green, very glossy foliage.  It is a breakthrough rose, coming from a breeder, Jim Sproul who has been working more than 20 years on Hulthemia hybrids.

Eyeconic Pink Lemonade has an excellent habit and self-cleaning. The plant is compact, bushy, approximately 3 ft. tall by 3 ft. wide. This ultra-vigorous shrub is a carefree addition to any garden. Unhappily, there is no fragrance.

 

Tip of the day: – Laugh a lot. Laughter is the best medicine.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

 

Rosalinda

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The Hildesheim Rose and a Motivational Tip for the day

 

Hildesheim Rose 2
Photo Credit – Wikipedia

I hear it all the time that rose is difficult to grow and yet the Hildesheim Rose, (Rosa canina commonly called dog rose) is estimated at approximately 1,000 years old. It is said to be the oldest rosebush in the world. It is the one climbing the wall of the apse of the Cathedral of Hildesheim in their courtyard at Hildesheim, Germany. It is a symbol of the city of Hildesheim and its prosperity. According to the legend, as long as the rose keeps blooming, Hildesheim will not decline. During World War II in 1945 allied bombers destroyed the cathedral yet the rose not only survived the bomb attacks but it grew new shoots just a few weeks later and soon was growing strong as ever. It has withstood war, drought, pestilence and poison gas to bloom serenely every summer against the Cathedral wall.

There are several mythical explanations of the origin of this rose. The most appealing story is that of Emperor Louis who became separated from his men while out hunting for deer. Night was falling and the snow was blowing fiercely about him as he hung his crucifix on a thorn tree, knelt and prayed for help. Worn out from his exertion he curled up in the snow and slept. The next morning, he awoke to find his crucifix hanging from a rose tree in full bloom. And through the leafless forest he saw his men walking toward him. In thanksgiving he built a chapel on the spot. The chapel grew in size until it became the great Cathedral of Hildesheim against which the rose still blooms.

Tip of the day – Don’t miss the chance to ask your grandparents questions before they die. They are a great resource of valuable life lessons but ask before it’s too late.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose named after Our Lady of Guadalupe and a Motivational Tip for the Christmas Season

IMG_3220

 

In the Rose Gardening World, Our Lady of Guadalupe is a lovely pink Floribunda with 25 petals. Our Lady of Guadalupe Rose blooms are complemented with reddish green leaves and very healthy. It is prolific bloomer and as good if not better than Knock Out roses in my garden.

 

When it was first introduced, only Jackson and Perkins carried it for a while with part of the sales going to a charity. It is such a lovely rose in the garden. I had two bushes planted in the middle of a formal garden with six roses on the same bed. On one of my Ice Cream Socials at my garden in New York, I showed the rose to the priest who was attending the Ice Cream Social. I also had two American Beauty roses, the priest’s favorite rose on the bed and two Brother Cadfael roses, another pink rose. The priest decided to bless the bed and the whole garden.

 

The following winter, we had a very harsh winter and lo and behold, the roses in that bed all died except Our Lady of Guadalupe. I then replaced the four roses with John Paul II, Brother Cadfael, Glamis Castle and Tess d’Urbervilles. When we had the Ice Cream Social again the next year, Fr. Burns was back and I told him the story. He could not believe it and told me he would tell his mother who loved to garden.

 

The feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe is Dec. 12. Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico. Our Lady of Guadalupe dates back to the 16th century, when, according to tradition, an Aztec Indian named Juan Diego had a vision of the Virgin Mary in December 1531 who identified herself in Spanish. The appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe generated the conversion of Mexico, Central and South America to Catholicism. Indeed, Our Lady of Guadalupe became an integral part of Mexican life and a central figure to the history of Mexico itself. The three most important religious celebrations in Central and South America are Christmas, Easter, and December 12, the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Her appearance in the center of the American continents has contributed to the Virgin of Guadalupe being given the title “Mother of the Americas”. After the Spanish Conquest, Diego was one of the first converts to Christianity, according to believers. He was canonized in 2002, making him the first indigenous American saint.

 

Tip of the Day – Share your time, treasure and talent to help others.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

A Climbing Rose (Winner’s Circle) and a Tip for a Successful Life

 

Winners Circle by Conard Pyle
Photo Credit – Conard Pyle

Class: Climber

Date of Introduction: 1997

Hybridizer: William Radler

Registration Name: RADwin

Parentage: RADliv x RADkoswe

 

Conard Pyle, the introducer of Knock Out Roses also introduced the climbing rose collection of William Radler, the hybridizer of the Knock Out Family of roses. Just like the Knock Out Roses, the climbing roses are also disease resistant. One of these climbing roses is Winner’s Circle™.

This new climber from the breeder of ‘Knock Out’ is sure to become a favorite. Winner’s Circle™ is a bright red climber and can reach a height up to 12 ft. with 4 ft. wide spread. Its blooms average 3.75”, fire-engine red but no fragrance. They are non-fading and can take the heat. It is winter hardy to zone 5. Winner’s Circle™ is floriferous, a vigorous climber with semi-glossy, dark green foliage. Disease resistance is excellent. In the fall the foliage turns deep burgundy red and the plants is covered with bright orange hips.

 

Tip of the day:  Aim high and hit the mark.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

 

 

 

A Rose (Olympiad) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 

Olympiad by Flickr
Photo Credit – Flickr.com

Parentage – (‘Red Planet’ x ‘Pharaoh’), 1982
Hybridizer – Sam McGredy, New Zealand
Introducer – Armstrong Nursery, Ontario, California

Olympiad was the official rose of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. It was also the winner of the All America Rose Selection Award in 1984 and the Gold Medal Portland Award in 1985. Olympiad is one of the best red hybrid teas as a bedding rose for gardeners and an excellent source for cut flower. The blooms come usually singly on long stems. Olympiad has good repeat throughout the season. The long pointed buds unfurl to double (35 to 40 petals), large (4 – 5 inches across), high-centered brilliant clear red flowers with a mild fragrance. Very thorny stems bear medium green, semi-glossy foliage with medium red new growth.

Olympiad

Olympiad is a tall (4 to 6 ft with a spread of 3 to 4 ft.) upright, compact rose plant. Disease resistance is generally good but if you have a problem with black spot in your area, it is advisable to take preventive measures. If only Olympiad had a strong fragrance, it could be a perfect rose.

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a good posture. Enter a room with poise and confidence.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.
Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Jubilee Celebration) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Jubilee Celebration

Rose:   Jubilee Celebration

Class:   Shrub

Hybridizer:   David Austin

Date of Introduction:   2002

 

 

Jubilee Celebration was named in commemoration of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee. It has lovely rich pink blooms with tints of gold on the underside of the petals. The blooms are large, pleasantly cupped above an attractive glossy foliage and blooms continuously. The rose is very healthy, vigorous, 4 ft. x 4 ft. building up into a fine shrub.

The scent of the young flower is almost pure lemon zest, later becoming a delicious, fruity rose fragrance with hints of fresh lemon and raspberry. It is an excellent rose throughout the US including the challenging hot and humid climate of the south east. Winner of the fragrance prize and people’s choice in Glasgow, Scotland.

I planted my one plant in a raised bed. It gets plenty of morning sun and shade in the afternoon and seems to be happy where it is.

 

Tip of the day – Commit yourself to constant self-improvement.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

Drift Roses – A Great Rose for Small Gardens

Pink Drift
Pink Drift by Conard-Pyle Co.

 

Drift® Roses are a cross between full-size groundcover roses and miniature roses.  A combination of toughness, disease resistance and winter hardiness with a manageable size and repeat blooming characteristics make Drift Roses the perfect plant for small gardens and containers.

 

Introduced in 2006 by the same company, Conard-Pyle Co. who brought us the Knock Out Family of roses, Drift Roses have been tested extensively under diverse climate conditions and are hardy to Zone 4. Like The Knock Out® Family of Roses, Drift® Roses are virtually maintenance-free and bloom almost continuously from spring to frost. The bloom cycle is about every 5-6 weeks.

 

Drift® Roses are low growing plants about 1-1/2 to 2 feet in height spreading to 3 to 4 feet wide with show stopping color and very attractive glossy foliage. They are great landscape plants providing colors for borders, perennial beds, hillsides for erosion control, foundation plantings and entryways. They are highly disease resistant which should appeal to busy gardeners.

 

There are 9 varieties: Apricot Drift, White Drift, Sweet Drift, Coral Drift, Pink Drift, Red Drift, Peach Drift, Lemon Drift and Popcorn Drift. Drift Roses are sold at independent garden centers and big box stores like Home Depot and Lowes.

 

Tip of the Day – Don’t procrastinate.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda