A Rose named after Our Lady of Guadalupe and a Motivational Tip for the Christmas Season

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In the Rose Gardening World, Our Lady of Guadalupe is a lovely pink Floribunda with 25 petals. Our Lady of Guadalupe Rose blooms are complemented with reddish green leaves and very healthy. It is prolific bloomer and as good if not better than Knock Out roses in my garden.

 

When it was first introduced, only Jackson and Perkins carried it for a while with part of the sales going to a charity. It is such a lovely rose in the garden. I had two bushes planted in the middle of a formal garden with six roses on the same bed. On one of my Ice Cream Socials at my garden in New York, I showed the rose to the priest who was attending the Ice Cream Social. I also had two American Beauty roses, the priest’s favorite rose on the bed and two Brother Cadfael roses, another pink rose. The priest decided to bless the bed and the whole garden.

 

The following winter, we had a very harsh winter and lo and behold, the roses in that bed all died except Our Lady of Guadalupe. I then replaced the four roses with John Paul II, Brother Cadfael, Glamis Castle and Tess d’Urbervilles. When we had the Ice Cream Social again the next year, Fr. Burns was back and I told him the story. He could not believe it and told me he would tell his mother who loved to garden.

 

The feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe is Dec. 12. Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico. Our Lady of Guadalupe dates back to the 16th century, when, according to tradition, an Aztec Indian named Juan Diego had a vision of the Virgin Mary in December 1531 who identified herself in Spanish. The appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe generated the conversion of Mexico, Central and South America to Catholicism. Indeed, Our Lady of Guadalupe became an integral part of Mexican life and a central figure to the history of Mexico itself. The three most important religious celebrations in Central and South America are Christmas, Easter, and December 12, the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Her appearance in the center of the American continents has contributed to the Virgin of Guadalupe being given the title “Mother of the Americas”. After the Spanish Conquest, Diego was one of the first converts to Christianity, according to believers. He was canonized in 2002, making him the first indigenous American saint.

 

Tip of the Day – Share your time, treasure and talent to help others.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

A Climbing Rose (Winner’s Circle) and a Tip for a Successful Life

 

Winners Circle by Conard Pyle
Photo Credit – Conard Pyle

Class: Climber

Date of Introduction: 1997

Hybridizer: William Radler

Registration Name: RADwin

Parentage: RADliv x RADkoswe

 

Conard Pyle, the introducer of Knock Out Roses also introduced the climbing rose collection of William Radler, the hybridizer of the Knock Out Family of roses. Just like the Knock Out Roses, the climbing roses are also disease resistant. One of these climbing roses is Winner’s Circle™.

This new climber from the breeder of ‘Knock Out’ is sure to become a favorite. Winner’s Circle™ is a bright red climber and can reach a height up to 12 ft. with 4 ft. wide spread. Its blooms average 3.75”, fire-engine red but no fragrance. They are non-fading and can take the heat. It is winter hardy to zone 5. Winner’s Circle™ is floriferous, a vigorous climber with semi-glossy, dark green foliage. Disease resistance is excellent. In the fall the foliage turns deep burgundy red and the plants is covered with bright orange hips.

 

Tip of the day:  Aim high and hit the mark.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

 

 

 

A Rose (Olympiad) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

 

Olympiad by Flickr
Photo Credit – Flickr.com

Parentage – (‘Red Planet’ x ‘Pharaoh’), 1982
Hybridizer – Sam McGredy, New Zealand
Introducer – Armstrong Nursery, Ontario, California

Olympiad was the official rose of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. It was also the winner of the All America Rose Selection Award in 1984 and the Gold Medal Portland Award in 1985. Olympiad is one of the best red hybrid teas as a bedding rose for gardeners and an excellent source for cut flower. The blooms come usually singly on long stems. Olympiad has good repeat throughout the season. The long pointed buds unfurl to double (35 to 40 petals), large (4 – 5 inches across), high-centered brilliant clear red flowers with a mild fragrance. Very thorny stems bear medium green, semi-glossy foliage with medium red new growth.

Olympiad

Olympiad is a tall (4 to 6 ft with a spread of 3 to 4 ft.) upright, compact rose plant. Disease resistance is generally good but if you have a problem with black spot in your area, it is advisable to take preventive measures. If only Olympiad had a strong fragrance, it could be a perfect rose.

 

Tip of the Day – Maintain a good posture. Enter a room with poise and confidence.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.
Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Jubilee Celebration) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Jubilee Celebration

Rose:   Jubilee Celebration

Class:   Shrub

Hybridizer:   David Austin

Date of Introduction:   2002

 

 

Jubilee Celebration was named in commemoration of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee. It has lovely rich pink blooms with tints of gold on the underside of the petals. The blooms are large, pleasantly cupped above an attractive glossy foliage and blooms continuously. The rose is very healthy, vigorous, 4 ft. x 4 ft. building up into a fine shrub.

The scent of the young flower is almost pure lemon zest, later becoming a delicious, fruity rose fragrance with hints of fresh lemon and raspberry. It is an excellent rose throughout the US including the challenging hot and humid climate of the south east. Winner of the fragrance prize and people’s choice in Glasgow, Scotland.

I planted my one plant in a raised bed. It gets plenty of morning sun and shade in the afternoon and seems to be happy where it is.

 

Tip of the day – Commit yourself to constant self-improvement.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

A Rose (Eyeconic Lemonade) and a Tip for a healthy Lifestyle

Eyeconic Lemonade
Photo Credit – Conard Pyle 

 

Class: Hybrid Hulthemia

Registered name: ‘PRolem’

 

Eyeconic™ Lemonade is bright sunny yellow rose on the outside with a ring ranging in brilliant deep pink to red eye inside of the petal. Eyeconic™Lemonade has excellent plant habit, very bushy and slightly larger in size than Eyeconic™ Pink Lemonade. It grows about 4 ½ ft. height and 4 ½ ft. wide.

Eyeconic™ Lemonade is ultra-vigorous, blooming heavily over 3 seasons with blooms in clusters of 3 to 5 blooms per stem complemented with dark green, very glossy foliage. The bud is of medium size, pointed and bright yellow developing into a self-cleaning 4-inch cup-shaped bloom with an average of 10-12 petals. It has a great flower power, blooming continuously with non- fading yellow blooms much stronger than most other yellow on the market. It has a very slight fragrance.

Eyeconic™Lemonade is a breakthrough hybrid hulthemia rose, coming from Jim Sproul, a breeder who has been working more than 15 years on Hulthemia hybrids. Eyeconics™ roses are perpetually blooming, self-cleaning, highly disease-resistant roses with “eyes”. The pioneering efforts of Harkness and other rosarians have resulted in the creation of the hybrid hulthemia by breeding the beautiful species Hulthemia persica with garden roses. Closely resembling a wild rose (to which it is almost certainly related), Hulthemia persica has a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and it is this spot that rose breeders wanted to hybridize.

 

Tip of the Day – Get a good night’s sleep. A lack of good sleep can contribute to obesity, injuries, depression and chronic diseases.

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Constance Spry) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Constance Spry

Constance Spry, introduced in 1961, is one of the first English Roses hybridized by David Austin and its success contributed to the founding of the English Roses. David Austin Roses is a flower arranger’s dream. They can be used to make wonderful floral arrangements either on their own or with other plant materials. With its voluptuous blossoms and dainty habit, you can duplicate the beauty and charm of an Old Dutch floral painting. 


Constance Spry Climber by DARPhoto Credit – David Austin Roses

 

Constance Spry can grow to a height of 6-12 ft. with a width of 6-8 ft. or 10 to 18 ft. as a climber. Bloom size is 3” with a petal count of 80+. It has a lovely pink color and very fragrant. The only drawback is it only flowers once in the spring but it blooms profusely.

Constance Spry by Flower Magazine
Photo Credit – Flower Magazine

Who is Constance Spry?

Constance Spry is the mother of modern floral design. She would have loved to use David Austin Roses for her floral arrangements. After World War 1, she changed the formal, rigid composition of floral design with unconventional pastoral compositions; flowers arranged asymmetrically with assorted shapes of foliage in various types of containers. She used all kinds of wildflowers, grasses, pods or practically anything the Victorian ladies shunned. Her style was full of drama and a refreshing reprieve from the more staid, stiff floral design of her contemporaries.

Constance Spry PinterestPhoto Credit – Pinterest

Connie, as she was known to her friends, was born in Derby, England, in 1886 and raised in Ireland. She found refuge from her domineering mother in the gardens of her childhood, where she began to take note of what would become her favorites: old garden roses, lilac, mock orange, laurel, buddleia, and evening primrose, as well as grasses, weeds, and other typically overlooked plants and materials.

Though flowers and gardening would be her lifelong passions, under her father’s direction she began her early professional life as an educator and social reformer. Traveling by horse-drawn wagon through the Irish countryside, she became a proponent of healthy living, educating housewives on the benefits of fresh air and nutritious food as part of a “War on Consumption” campaign. After a disappointing marriage to a coal mine manager, she took her only son back to England to begin life anew. It was there she met and fell in love with Shav Spry, a colonial civil servant who would be her lifelong companion.

It wasn’t until the age of 41, that Spry’s amateur talents as a floral designer were noticed by an influential lunch companion, leading her to Norman Wilkinson, a theater designer whose encouragement would launch her meteoric design career. With a commission to do flowers for cinemas and a perfume shop, Spry took her unorthodox visions of gathered materials and artful references out of the homes of friends and into the public eye, where she was praised for displays that in an incredibly modern twist included leaves, berries, seed pods, wild clematis, and golden hops mixed with exotic orchids. Her fate was sealed.

Suddenly this middle-aged woman found herself thrust into the social scene, befriending legendary decorator and fellow entrepreneur Syrie Maugham and an exuberant crowd of theatrical personalities and social luminaries. She became the florist of choice to London high society organizing the flowers for royal weddings. She designed the flowers for the Queen’s wedding and Coronation. Her books on flower arranging made her a household name.

Constance Spry Cookery Book by antique-atlas.com
Photo Credit – Antiques-Atlas.com

 

Besides being an influential floral artist, Constance Spry is the founder of the Cordon Bleu cooking school and an author of a bestselling cookbook bearing her name.

 

 

 

Tip of the Day – Turn your passions and interests into a career.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

Drift Roses – A Great Rose for Small Gardens

Pink Drift
Pink Drift by Conard-Pyle Co.

 

Drift® Roses are a cross between full-size groundcover roses and miniature roses.  A combination of toughness, disease resistance and winter hardiness with a manageable size and repeat blooming characteristics make Drift Roses the perfect plant for small gardens and containers.

 

Introduced in 2006 by the same company, Conard-Pyle Co. who brought us the Knock Out Family of roses, Drift Roses have been tested extensively under diverse climate conditions and are hardy to Zone 4. Like The Knock Out® Family of Roses, Drift® Roses are virtually maintenance-free and bloom almost continuously from spring to frost. The bloom cycle is about every 5-6 weeks.

 

Drift® Roses are low growing plants about 1-1/2 to 2 feet in height spreading to 3 to 4 feet wide with show stopping color and very attractive glossy foliage. They are great landscape plants providing colors for borders, perennial beds, hillsides for erosion control, foundation plantings and entryways. They are highly disease resistant which should appeal to busy gardeners.

 

There are 9 varieties: Apricot Drift, White Drift, Sweet Drift, Coral Drift, Pink Drift, Red Drift, Peach Drift, Lemon Drift and Popcorn Drift. Drift Roses are sold at independent garden centers and big box stores like Home Depot and Lowes.

 

Tip of the Day – Don’t procrastinate.

 

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda