A Rose (Rosa Foetida Bicolor) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Austrian Copper

Class:   Species

Date of Introduction:   Before 1590

Common Name:   ‘Austrian Copper’

 

Not until late nineteenth century when a French breeder named Pernet-Ducher introduced ‘Rosa foetida persiana’ as a pollen parent to breed the first yellow and orange colored large-flowered rose called ‘Soleil d’Or’ did gardeners take notice of this rose coloration. That was a significant event.

‘Austrian Copper’ is a sport of ‘Rosa foetida’ that has been cultivated as early as the 12th century in the Arab world. It is native to Iran and Afghanistan and it is not Austrian in spite of its name. It has single blossoms, 2” in diameter of bright coppery red with yellow reverse and bright yellow stamens. Its color is eye catching. The rose is so beautiful when the sun is shining behind it. It gives such luminescence that’s so magnificent. The petals are very fragile and heavy wind will knock the petals off easily. It is not fussy about soil and can be grown in poor soil as long as there is good drainage. It is winter hardy and requires little care. It is a vigorous grower and it suckers. It can take over a large area if not controlled. It has long, arching canes that can reach up to 8 ft. and can be trained to climb trellis, pergola, fence or even trees. It only takes a couple of years for the plant to reach 6 to 7 ft. high and can grow as high as 20 ft. When trained horizontally, they develop lateral shoots which will be covered with flowers the following season. Flowers arise from old wood so pruning should be done after it finishes flowering. It is a once bloomer, in late spring or early summer for 2 to 3 weeks.

Most often, ‘Austrian Copper’ will sport back to ‘Rosa foetida’. It is a stunning plant and every garden should have it. The only downside is it is susceptible to black spot so separate it from the rest of your roses. For rose exhibitor, this rose is eligible for Genesis Award.

 

Tip of the Day:   Eat your veggies. They are good for you. 

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda

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A Rose (Sally Holmes) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

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Name: Sally Holmes’

Class: Shrub

Parentage: ‘Ballerina’ x ‘Ivory Fashion’

Hybridizer: Robert A. Holmes

Introduced by: Fryer’s Roses in U.K.

 

‘Sally Holmes’ rose was introduced in 1976 and is a cross between ‘Ballerina’, a hybrid musk and ‘Ivory Fashion’, a Floribunda. It is a single rose of five petals with bloom size of 3” to 4” across with yellow stamens. ‘Sally Holmes’ rose is classified as a shrub but it is so vigorous, it can easily be grown as a climber.

I have seen ‘Sally Holmes’ rose at a friend’s front yard and it is quite a sight. The rose grows all the way to the second floor. It has to be tied strongly to the wall for support. It can grown from 6’ as a shrub and up to 12’ as a climber with almost thornless canes. ‘Sally Holmes’ rose is considered a white shrub rose but her tight buds will appear light apricot maturing to white with a tint of pink at the edges. Foliage is glossy and very disease-resistant. It is also shade tolerant. It has a sweet fragrance.

If you are an exhibitor, it constantly wins awards at the show table. ‘Sally Holmes’ rose is truly an spectacular rose.

Awards:

Baden-Baden Gold Medal 1960

Glasgow – Fragrance 1993

Portland – Gold Medal 1996

 

Tip #41 – Judge your success by the degree that you’re enjoying peace, health, and love.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

A Rose (Tournament of Roses) and a Tip for a Happy, Healthy and Successful Living

Tournament of Roses

Class:   Grandiflora

Parentage:   ‘Impatient’ x seedling

Hybridizer – William Warriner

Date of Introduction:   1988

This pink grandiflora of 25 to 30 petals is aptly named in honor of the Tournament of Roses, the famous parade of all times held annually on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, California. Tournament of Roses is an AARS selection in 1989. It is sometimes classified as a hybrid tea because of the shape of its flowers although it is really a grandiflora.

Bloom size is 3.5 inches on long stem with light fragrance. The blooms have all shades of pink within them – deep pink in the center, pale pink at the edges, darker pink on the outside. Tournament of Roses blooms profusely in clusters of 5 to 7 blooms like a floribunda on a medium upright bush with glossy dark green leaves and large prickles. It is highly disease-resistant and easy to grow. It produces blooms well into the winter.  Tournament of Roses is both an excellent rose for exhibition and garden rose with plenty of blooms to enjoy outside in the garden and to take indoors to enjoy.

 

Tip #39 – Don’t accept “good enough” as good enough.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

 Rosalinda